Friday, July 07, 2006

Early Drinking Significantly Raises Dependency Risk In Later Years

Here we have another "study" from the no-shit-Sherlock department. Why can't I get funding for some of these no-brainers?

If a person starts drinking alcohol before 14 years of age he/she is at a 78% higher risk of having an alcohol problem in later years compared with people who start when they are at least 21, say researchers from Boston University School of Public Health, USA.

How much did they have to spend to figure out that? Of course if someone starts any bad habit early, it is more likely to persist; haven't these people got any contact with the real world?

4 comments:

Blaez said...

Im sure thats why they get funding easily, because its a guarantee to be what they want it to be...

ya. something like that...

GUYK said...

I would probably argue that but I am too lazy to dig out the stats. Alcohol addiction and abuse has little to with when one started using alcohol..I do know that in most of Europe the drinking age is 16 and even that is usually winked at. In germany kids learn to drink beer and wine with their families as early as nine or ten..and the percentage of alcoholics there is no more than the USA.

Being a recovered alcoholic I can speak with some experience..it is not the age that one begins to drink or even how much one drinks..it is why and how often.

BobG said...

I agree that substance abuse has a lot to do with why and frequency, but when a person is drinking to fit in or because they are unhappy, they are prime candidates to continue the abuse into adulthood. In teenagers, we have people who are impressionable, trying to be like everyone else (no matter HOW much they brag of being individuals), and many are unhappy with themselves. They become substance abusers easily for the same reason they tend to get reeled into cults.

Karen said...

Common sense isn't so common, is it? That is full of the DUH Factor!